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Cannabis, Cannabidiol, Cannabinoids, and Multigenerational Policy

Studies in the U.S. and Europe confirm that:


1) 46/62 (U.S.) and 90/95 (Europe) congenital anomalies have a causal relationship to cannabinoid exposure;

2) 25/28 (U.S.) and 33/40 (Europe) cancers could be related to cannabinoid exposure;

3) the aging process is accelerated as a result of cannabis exposure by "some 30% at 30 years of age" and increases with age at time of exposure, accounting for "progressive loss of function."


A dose/response effect is clear in the lab data and epidemiologically for congenital anomalies and cancers. More frequent use, use prevalence and current potency of cannabinoids puts many communities at genotoxic risk levels associated with high cannabinoid exposure.


"Taken together, these data make a strong case that cannabinoid genotoxicity is causally and exponentially related to multiple adverse outcomes, including mental illness, developmental neurological syndromes including autism spectrum disorders, many cancers and congenital anomalies, and clinically significant acceleration of aging. These adverse outcomes exceed those from tobacco and alcohol, which strongly indicates that cannabinoids should be regulated similarly to all other potent genotoxic agents."



Article authors:

Albert Stuart Reece and Gary Kenneth Hulse:

Division of Psychiatry, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia

School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, WA 6027, Australia


Wei Wang:

Centre for Precision Health, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, WA 6027, Australia

Beijing Municipal Key Laboratory of Clinical Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100067, China

The First Affiliated Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Shantou 515041, China

School of Public Health, Shandong First Medical University & Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, Tai'an 271016, China


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